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with the disconnect that i was alluding to earlier between how science deals with this question and how lawyers deal with this question is that you actually get a fundamental disconnect between the two systems. so you mentioned that lack of emotional control or lack of ability to control your preferences might lead to insanity, but, in fact, in most jurisdictions as you know, that's not true. after hanky was acquitted under the american law institute test because he could not control his behavior, congress in most state jurisdictions changed the law, got rid of the lack of emotional test, the a.l.i. test and now in most jurisdictions, the nontest requires that you demonstrate that you can't distinguish right from wrong. so now we have, and again, the law uses science for the law's own purposes, but what is problematic here is the disconnect. from the criminal side, if you lack emotional control, you go to prison because you can't win under the test because the test doesn't apply. when you walk out of prison and you lack emotional control, you get civilly committed. so what we have is a fundamental d
take the science and develop methodologies or evaluate methodologies. how has that been undertaken in recent years? well, what samhsa attempts to do is work in partnership with our colleagues at the national institutes-national institute of mental health, the national institute of drug abuse, the national institute of alcoholism and alcohol abuse, and other nih institutes-and that science that they developed, as was pointed out by dr. laudet, was very rigorous, but translating, as dr. peterson pointed out, into practice is complex. so, using our addiction technology transfer centers, we need to educate people about the science. we have to influence the behavior when we use our funding to, shall we say, prime the pump, allow community-based organizations, state authorities, county authorities, tribal authorities to explore the implications of the science that's been developed by researchers for community practice because that's what's pointed out. they work brilliantly in the laboratory or an exquisitely controlled study, but doesn't work when generalized to the general community. s
science fiction and science fact. a giant robot made its debut in tokyo. people can control it either by sitting inside or with a smartphone. the four meter tall robot appeared at a media event at the national museum of emerging science of innovation. a group of artists and robot engineers spent two years developing it. an operator in the cockpit can manipulate the robot's fingers using a special kind of glove. developer and artist koguro kurata says he worked on the giant creation as a hobby. >> translator: if you are inspired to make something similar to this, please do so without hesitation. it can even be a self-assembly model. >> the robot will be on display in the museum through december 10th. >>> that's all for this edition of "newsline." i'm catherine kobayashi in tokyo. we'll
guard. >> from more information, visit >> when the new california academy of sciences opened in 2008, it quickly became one of the top tourist magnets in the city. part of the cal academies' astronomical success is the weekly nightlife party. >> i am joined by helen, who is here to school me on all the nocturnal activities that are getting ready to take place here. tell us a little about what we can expect to see at nightlife. >> we open up the doors every thursday night at the california academy of sciences. there are certain things you can see every week you can go to the museum, visit the planetarium, and we bring in bars and a deejay or band. it is a different feel from during the day, something different every week. tonight , we have beer and music. -- tonight we have great beer and music. it is beer week. we have a dozen local brewers in african hall. we have a deejays to set up throughout the museum and a live performance at 9:00 p.m. tonight. >> what has been your favorite part as a participant or as an observer? >> my favorite part is to walk around the aquarium in to see pe
. on the campaign trail we heard governor romney say he supported a green card to the every math and science graduate from our university. why should we educate some of the best minds on earth and say sorry, no room in the u.s. economy for you? it makes no sense. they go away and compete against us rather than innovating and creating jobs here. then i took a closer look at what the republicans are actually proposing. they haven't turned the corner at all. in fact, they haven't even stepped out of their houses. they certainly didn't learn anything from the last election. the stem visa bill on the house floor this week was actually voted down in september. it was introduced with a few changes and no consultation with democrats. i want to find a bipartisan solution on immigration. i'm committed to it. i know it won't be easy. they say a journey of 1,000 miles begins with just one step. the problem is my colleagues on the other side of the aisle want to take one step and have the democrats travel the other 999.9 miles. certainly this bill isn't even a step it's a shell game. it's the same proble
are three key ethical -- the first one is this. i do not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have
a damn about science. "the young turks." [ ♪ music ♪ ] >> eliot: good evening i'm eliot spitzer and this is "viewpoint." on this show we prefer to call it the fiscal cliff or the austerity bomb. either way the country is just 34 days away from the mix of hundreds of billions of dollars with expireing tax cuts. the president called on voters though pressure congress for a deal that would freeze taxes for 911%98% of for american families. >> call members of congress, write them, e-mail, post it on their facebook wall. tweet it by using the hash tag "my 2 k." >> if the latest "washington post" "abc news" poll is correct, the 06% 60% said they supported, and oklahoma congressman tom cole told politico last night, i quote i think we ought to take the 98% deal right now. it doesn't mean that i agree with raising the top two i don't. but house speaker john boehner disagreed with that call. >> i told him that i disagreed with him. >> eliot: he seemed more interesting in attacking the president than finding common ground. >> as the speaker said we have done our part. we have pup revenue
will cause new reactions. niceroony, that's junior high school knowledge, yeah, anyone takes a science course. what we wanna know is why all that energy, and i have a model for you to consider. and it has to do with mass. see on the table here, i have-- oh, it's imagination time. look, i have all the 92 elements in the periodic table that's found commonly in the earth's crust, almost all 92, are all arranged here. see the hydrogen here? see the hydrogen atom? what's this one here? helium. helium. what's this one? lithium. lithium. i got no names, but you can just kinda look at them, right? what's the next one? i keep running after you. i know what the last one is. you guys know what the last one is, 92? begins with u. uranium. uranium. excellent. okay. and so i have all the atoms all lined up here. can you see them? at least in your mind's eye. now what i'm gonna do is i'm gonna shake the atoms. i'm gonna take the hydrogen-- just the nucleus of the atom, okay? i take the hydrogen, i shake it back and forth, okay? now, it's harder to shake the helium. how come? because it has more mass. there'
-link fence. take a look at this clip. doesn't that look like something out of a science fiction movie where aliens are invading? escape from new york part 2. anybody who has seen that footage knows we need to upgrade our equipment. that's where quanti-services comes in. it's a leading special contractor that designs, installs, upgrades, repairs and main tans electric power networks, both for transmission and distribution. if you were driving on any interstate before sandy, you probably saw caravans of trucks -- what is that company? it's the who you gonna call outfit. plus quanta builds oil and gas pipelin pipelines. in short, it's a post-sandy play with a pipeline kicker. no wonder the stock at 25 is only a pont and a half off its 52-week high. because our grid is in dire repairs, spending is on the rise, with an estimated 2 to 3 times average historical levels action and we can say for many years to come. this was ready before sandy was hit. it's fabulous for quanta. post-sandy -- thanks to these trend they're looking at solid growth for the next three to five years. because so much of th
unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competen
-gay industry did nothing but provide me and my family with false lies mass ka raiding as science. >> representative jackie spear joins me now live from capitol hill. congresswoman, thank you so much for joining us. my first question to you, why not just introduce legislation to ban it? why the nonbinding resolution? >> it is a state function to regulate professions, so it is incumbent on the states to look at the scope of practice within professions and determine whether certain practices are appropriate or not. the american psychological association and the american psychiatric association has said for more than 40 years that this is junk science. that there is no science that supports this conversion therapy or reparative therapy. so, this is an effort to put a spotlight on the issue and then from a federal point of view, i want to make sure that the taxpayer dollars aren't being spent on providing the services when they are not held to be scientifically effectively. >> okay, okay. we have got that. i want to hear more from young people at the news conference who went through c
that we can get this done is because the reality is it is not rocket science -- we can get it done. mr. chairman, whether it is our current chairman, john larson, or our future chairman -- whoever gets to lead this caucus knows we have got an enthusiastic group of committed representatives of this country ready to get the job done. >> questions? >> congressman, if republicans are willing to step up and raise revenue, will house democrats provide votes to cut benefits to programs like medicare and medicaid? >> let me say that clearly, as gene sperling was sent today, the president is willing to look at what they're going to put forward in terms of revenues, but that has not been forthcoming, shall we say. with the president has been very clear is in terms of the impact on beneficiaries and beneficiaries are the people who are the recipients of medicaid, medicare, and social security -- we believe at most would agree that social security is not responsible for the deficit and should not be on at the table for discussion. with regard to the so-called entitlements -- i come from hartford,
on for our construction update for today. it is now displayed to the public at the academy of science and that will run for a number of months. so we would like to thank the california academy for putting on display the mammoth tooth. and we will be looking for a new home in 2013. and finally on october 17th we had number one of our regularly schedule committee meetings to provide a construction update to our neighbors. so everything that moving along well. now to give our construction update with steve turner. >> good morning, directors. steve, ru, with turner construction, construction oversight. i don't know. is that up? there it is. >> another good month, of work or almost a month and a half since we filled you in on the last period. there were no recordable incidents. we did have one near miss. but, brought to light some issues with the excavation process of sight lines and so that has been dealt with successfully. and allowing the excavator to work while the folks down below were able to position themselves appropriately so they are not in the way of it. we have 550,000 craft ho
of life. >> reporter: still, they are interested in the very possibility, one explored by science in films ranging from "war of the worlds," to modern fiction like mars attacks, and by entrepreneurs who see the human colonies on mars within 20 years. >> we're on the way to establishing a self-sustaining group. >> reporter: now, a scoop of sand picked up 180 million miles away could bring some answers at a conference next week >> if they find life exists on mars, that would be extraordinary. >> reporter: evidence, perhaps, but the odds of proof in the first pinch of martian sand? there is a much better chance of winning the powerball lottery. mike taibbi, pasadena. >> that is our broadcast for a wednesday night. thank you for joining us, if you're watching us here on earth, don't forget you can see the rockefeller christmas tree lighting right here tonight on this nbc station. i'm brian williams, we hope to see you right back here tomorrow evening. good night. we have live team coverage. >> reporter: a 15-year-old is charged as an adult after a violent crime spree. that's coming up. >>> and
issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides
.s., 55 pounds a year, highest in the world. a lot coming from soft drinks. >>> this is not science fiction this is from newly unclassified documents that shows the united states once planned to set off a nuclear explosion on the moon, during the height of the cold war the plan called for a ballistic missile launched from the earth. officials considered using a bomb about the size of the one used on hiroshima. the idea was to intimidate the soviet union. >>> we are following breaking news on the peninsula, police investigation underway now after a woman wakes up in the middle of the night to find a stranger in house. katie marzullo will join us next. >>> two teenaged girls, murdered in a hail of bullets many next, the dad talks about his murdered daughter as oakland resi
edition of the road to recovery . today, we'll be talking about research to practice, how science is helping people with mental and substance use disorders. joining us in our panel today are dr. h. wesley clark, director, center for substance abuse treatment, substance abuse and mental health services administration, u.s. department of health and human services, rockville, maryland; dr. thomas mclellan, director, center for substance abuse solutions, philadelphia, pennsylvania; dr. alexandre laudet, director, center for the study of addictions and recovery, national development and research institutes, incorporated, new york, new york; dr. candace peterson, associate scientist, evaluation shared service, university of wisconsin population health institute, madison, wisconsin. dr. clark, what does research to practice mean and what does it mean for a methodology or a practice to be evidence-based? research to practice is a concept that captures the evolvement in the research community with regard to various aspects of, in this case, substance abuse or mental health care in an effor
the market is doing and being ready, no matter what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. which isn't rocket science. you know it can be hard to lbreathe, and how that feels.e, copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphysema. spiriva helps control my copd symptoms by keeping my airways open for 24 hours. plus, it reduces copd flare-ups. spiva is the only once-daily inled copd maintenance trtment that does both. spiriva handihaler tiotropium bromidinhalation powder does not replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms. tell your doctor if you ve kidney problems, glaucoma, trouble urinating, or an enlarged prostate. the may worsen with spiriva. discuss all medicines you take, even eye drops. stop taking iriva and seek immediate medical help discif your breathing you suddly worsens,drops. your throat or tongue swells, you get hives, vision changes or eye pain, or problems passing urine. other side effects include dry mouth and constipation. nothing can reverse copd spiriva helps me breathe better. (blowing sou) ask your doctor about spiriva. dave
it in his mug ahead of time. >>> the science of e-mail fund-raising. how the obama campaign mastered the art of asking for money over and over again. bloomberg businessweek's josh green joins us next with an exclusive first look at his new piece on "morning joe." >>> beautiful picture of the sun coming up over washington. joining us now from d.c., senior national correspondent for "businessweek," josh green looks at the science behind the obama campaign's very successful e-mail blasts. maybe you even saw them. josh writes in part, "one fascination in a presidential race mostly bereft of intrigue was the strange, incessant and weirdly overfamiliar e-mails that emanated from the obama campaign. anyone who shared an address with the campaign soon started receiving messages from barack obama with subject lines like "join me for dinner?" or "it's officially over," "it doesn't have to be this way," or just "wow." jon stewart mocked them on the daily show, the hairpin likened them to notes from a stalker, but they worked. most of the $690 million obama raised online came from fund-raising e-mails."
that connects us. and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the battle for control of syria reached ever closer to the capital today. heavy fighting flared near the damascus airport, and online access was cut, as the pressure intensified on president bashar al-assad. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: it could be the west's worst nightmare. jubilant jihadist fighters near damascus. this group has captured a helicopter and these islamists are now in the vanguard of syria's rebel army. syrian warplanes and helicopters were filmed attacking the fringes of the capital today. and to the road to the international airport has been closed by fighting. and as that fighting intensifies much of syria's internet n
? no, they're often not, but the science and the knowledge is there. do they invariably have the art that a good, homey, family-medicine doctor will have? no. no. i don't take any pride in the fact that we haven't been able to get everybody to have a good bedside manner, but the science is there. and sometimes it's worthwhile to just gird your belt and accept a big academic medical center so you can get the best opinion you can. of course, i want to see diplomas on the wall, and, you know, i want to see that they've been published and all that sort of thing. but, to me, far more important is the doctor's ability to connect with me as a human being. the relationship between doctor and patient-- that human connection-- plays a role in the healing process that sometimes goes beyond degrees and scientific knowledge. marc shiffman: there are 11 residents down here at vario levels of instruction, training, experience, and i try and convey to them how much of a privilege it is to practice medicine, how difficult it is to practice primary care medicine, and how much more difficult it is to
the film has is gives everyone a unified collective science of agreement to which they roll up the sleeves and get busy creating change and has been really exciting. i building we already i believe kroshed the threshold of 140,000 students nationwide and we are working to get to the million and the idea is a million is a tipping point . a million kids in america. that's like one in ten basically in public schools. that gets embedded so over time every september schools are starting with that method to have that agreement, and along the way we're also trying to deliver youth action and educate ideas and teach the schools and districts about social emotional learning because after they see the film they want to know what do we do next? how do we impact that? and that's what i am up to and it's great to be here. >> thanks so much for coming here. we appreciate it. [applause] >> good afternoon everyone. i am rachel smith falls and a senior vice president here of futures without violence i wanted to thank you all for being here and formally welcome to futures without violence. as many
to document, we feel like this is the science of it which, you know, sounds a little sterile when you consider the emotional loss, but that you document each incident as it happens so you have a record and you also look at the climate, the culture, and also the perpetrator. we have a second piece of legislation that calls for the restoretive justice element that people were talking about with regard to bullying, not just lgbt kids but in general. there was a sect committee this year of men and boys of color and that committee came out with a number of pieces of legislation all based on alerting to more programs, actually codifying the issue and also consequences and solutions and particularly with an accent on looking on is suspension automatic, is expulsion automatic. cyber bullying, another dimension of all this, the new technology, we're all catching up, there are two, three pieces of legislation that i co-authored, i am not the sponsor, that deals with cyber bullying. i will say the social networking folks have been very cooperative about that. so just, in sum, we have sacramento's intent
explanation in at this point to show you what happens when the social sciences and the humanities collide, you get total confusion here. because we had gordon melton here talking about what do we do with this sect/cult typology due to susanna's good question about christianity we tried to use that typology to describe the development of christianity and how it could have gone through all of our various stages. but here we have a believer and we always go to believers who has trouble would have trouble with any of that. wants to make a whole new category do i hear that a religion can simply be a brand new revelation with absolutely no connection whatsoever culturally to anything that came before it. and what could be the response to that? that's the entitlement of the person who is the believer but - let me get your comments. >> he did make reference a bit to the islam thing. he explained it very well. i had no idea what the bahai was. i had them confused with - well somebody said well whatever it is it's a pretty building go see it. that's all i've ever heard about it until today really. >> ye
is cyber bullying and the top scholars in the country and in social science and psychology that saying that, so that's an important distinction so thank you both so much. >> and there is that and -- there's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but it's going to be hard in this ark and we are in this area and people are coming forward, kids are coming forward . suicides that would have been kept forward or not reporting and we're learning thanks to rapid fire and thanks to social networking or facebook and this is a sued -- all of this the -- the volume of bullying is going to rise in proportion with i think the actual drop in occurrences so to balance that and be aware of that i think is important. >>i totally agree, and that's really to rosylyn's point about this being a very, very important moment and we need to did it right. just on the subject of suicide the surgeon general came out this week and there was a
. >> is not a perfect science. you don't satisfy even but i think the proposal is a come good compromise. >> reporter: the owner fought for the change. >> we are surrounded with great corporate corporate business. so if we don't have more restaurants open late at night, we may not be the right draw. >> for businesses or any crowd looking to spend a fun night out. >> they are going to livermore, walnut creek where there's more activity at night time. i think they want to try to get that feeling here in pleasanton. >> reporter: back here live, alberto's cantina is just wrapping up and is open later on the weekend until midnight because it has a special permit. that is still the case for business if they want those extended hours them city leaders say they are excited about the plan but will revisit it in a year to see if it is working and what, if anything, needs to be changed. downtown pleasanton, nbc news. >>> that time of the year when people scour the malls ante web for that something special. >> if you are looking for the hottest tech products look no further. scott budman has already found them f
science and conservation biology at ucla so hopefully there is some input i can put in the subject. what i want to focus on is the aspect of stewardship in this issue. ecosystems are a very fragile organism. ze you can say, and there are organisms involved in it. tampering with even the smallest piece of that could have dire consequences. and as we can see with the gulf folks they have tampered with the ecosystem. the frog eggs as they have moved from the original location. something as simple as that could cause awful things to happen to the ecosystem. and if these gulf folks are so free to even tamper with that, then who knows what could come next. it's not out of their character to try to evade the process of ceqa. that is what they are trying to do right now. what we can hope to do is stop them from getting away with this so that hopefully other institutions similar to them will not be able to do this very same thing in the future. thank you. >> next speaker. >>> hi, i'm virginia marshall from the sequoia audubon society and we do also support this resolution for reasons that have bee
unfortunately staff members are part of it. i remember being accused early on by a science teacher and told i was using lsd and i didn't know what it was at the time. i was in the class for three months and didn't work english and the teacher didn't realize i didn't speak english and there was only 20 in the classroom and bullying can take different shapes and not paying attention and caring and while we're focusing on what kids are doing to each other, we must not ignore that sometimes adults can be part of the problem just by their behavior, even by the way they look the other way. i agree with richard 100% that we need to deal with this but zero tolerance has to be articulated in a very different way. 36% of kids that are bullied everyday report not coming to school. there is another piece that is important. as a member of the justice center we did intensive study of school discipline last year and looked at a million roashds and 60% that are disciplined incredibly more likely to drop out of school and end up in the criminal justice system and while we are working with the victims and
for education and train science and research. >> any republican who buys this is a fool. republicans have stood for one thing statistically that held them. they are the low tax party. the other guys want to tax to match their reckless spending. if they give it up now in return for nothing, obama wins and high wins big. i understand why the democrats are doing this. they imagine that republicans have no bargaining power today . i say that it is true if republicans resist they will take the blame and that will help democrats in the congress. but obama's never running again. he doesn't care who gets the blame. he is the president and a blame duck. he wants a successful second term. if it starts by going over the cliff it starts with second recession and wrecked second term. >> steve: that's why the president said i would be willing to do anything to get a deal. >> gretchen: it is not a deal. this is what the american public needs to know. this is raising taxos successful people and reducing taxes on the middle class. that is not a deal folks. they will waste your taxpayer dollars and overspend and
by the journal of environmental science and technology. most are treated with chemicals that are supposed to prevent fire. many of the chemicals have been banned because they can cause cancer among other problems. >> that is scary. the words husband and wife getting axed from marriage certificates in washington. they will likely be replaced with more gender neutral terms spouse a and spouse b. the same-sex marriage law takes effect december 6th. >> the video you have to see a zebra and tony captured on cell phone video running wild through the streets of staten island, new york. it happened during a busy morning commute. >>> it's a zebra. it's staten island running past me. it came towards me. i tried to stop him so it didn't run into the street. it didn't stop. they were running so fast. it was like a herd moving the pony was leading and the zebra was behind it. >> behind them the petting zoo owner. he let them out of their stalls to clean the stalls and forgot to close the gate. with the help of the nypd he was able to get them back home safely. >> nypd does just about everything. >> th
art institute. i haven't heard california college of arts and sciences, but i'm sure there are many, many more that would probably have some things they could bring to the table and draft something that worked in a cooperative manner. so, i'm probably in favor of a continuance. it might not have to be a long one. maybe mattious might be able to give us an idea how long you think it might take if we had a continuance to get together with these groups. if you wanted to give me some input on that, i'd be happy to have some guidance as to how long a period of time you feel you'd be able to work out the various outreach that we're talking about. * >> being unaware of your schedule, and i know that the board of supervisors will go into recess in two weeks. but i believe that to be on the safe side, something around mid january would probably be the safest so that there will be time both before and after the holidays to conduct those conversations. [speaker not understood]. >> great, thank you. okay, those were my main feelings. >> commissioner borden. >> yeah, i do have a question for sta
for college you're able to access living wage jobs and if you don't have math and science classes that are required a through g you're not going to be able to go into apprenticeship for building and trade programs. so this is an important policy for the city. unfortunately with our first two classes the level of cuts that they've been experienced has not allowed our school district to fully support the program that is needed to do that. i think, also, with our city passing really the highest budget that we have seen in our city's history i think it's more important than ever that we really step our support for your families and our kids. that being said i think that there are a lot of conversations in kind of moving targets as we're finding different moneys coming in from the last fiscal year so i wanted to allow greater time for a conversation to happen about both sources of funding and also specifically how this investment that the city is making, in our class of 2014-15 are going to be met over the next two weeks. so i would like to make a motion to continue this item as well t
what happens, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. all in hardcover books is continuing. just look at a barnes and noble, falling 11%, nearly 12%. quarterly results were worse than expected. enook the is not keeping up with demand to the kindle, the one in my neighborhood just closed down. that is depressing. i like reading the book itself. am i the only one? do you still read our book? dave: i have trouble with the reflection and glare on the e readers as well. the markets are doing pretty well. there was the debt earlier today when there was all the pessimistic ruling from inside the beltway the deal was farther away than ever and the talk began to moderate and the market is doing okay. let's go to nicole petallides at the stock exchange because for all the talk in a bell weather was some talk from investors looking at rim that we are not only good for that particular stock as a jump over a 4% but good for the market. >> when you look and research in motion lot of people wrote the moth saying blackberry is not so great, and echoing what other people
degree who we want to keep here in science, technology, engineering, and math. in many cases, if they're not allowed to stay, they will have to return to other countries and the jobs will follow them, costing our country jobs. choose between them and allowing people here from countries other than mexico, india, and china. some of whom are high skilled, some of whom are low skilled, divorce group across the board and looking back at many of our own forebears, certainly mine mitigating circumstance family came to this country in the late 19th century and early 20th century, 1890's, 1905. they didn't have master's degrees they zrntpampede's they didn't have college degrees. and that's the case for many of our forebears. and here today their great grandson sits as a member of congress. and had a program then existed whereby they could arrive nellliss island and be here, i wouldn't be here today my father has a ph.d. but that's a legacy of his hardworking immigrant grandparents who came to this country without a college degree. and in many cases without something that's the equivalent of e
by preventing fires from spreading. the study appears in environmental science and tech following journal. >> a drug commonly prescribed to control heart rhythm could prove fatal. a study suggests it increases the risk of death fr patients, it occurs when upper chambers contract chaoticly. a study says people who took it for six months had a 61% of dying. >> it seems a study find both on their own reduce chances of people with high cholesterol from die bug together had a rater affect. researchers say exercise can be moderate such as a brisk walk, just 30 minutes per day. >> first lady hosted military families and children to help decorate the white house for christmas part of the joining forces campaign connecting veteran with resources to help them find jobs. the first lady announced the theme is joy to all. and talked about the tree dedicated to the military. >> it's a special joining forces tree. it's covered. with hand decorated ornaments made by children living in u.s. bases around the world. we have spent months and months gathering beautiful ornaments. and the first lady says there
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪ you can stay in and like something... ♪ [ car alarm deactivates ] ♪ ...or you can get out there with your family and actually like something. ♪ the lexus december to remember sales event is on, offering some of our best values of the year. this is the pursuit of perfection. ois bigger than we think ... sometimelike the flu.fer from with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have serious health conditions, or take other medicines. if you develop an allergic reaction, a severe rash, or signs of unusual behavior, stop taking
doesn't thing climate change is caused by human behavior, and now he's in charge of, wow the science committee. you could find more divererererererererererererererererererererererererererererer >> eliot: how do you convention millions of americans to impose a tax increase that will have no impact on them or their friends. some how the g.o.p. has managed to do it president obama's proposed tax increase on the wealthiest 2% of americans would affect 4 million households. they're predominately in areas like south florida major cities like new york, francisco and los angeles, all traditionally democratic enclaves. those who are won't pay the taxes oppose them, and those who will support it. here with me, robert reich at u uc berkeley's goldman school of policies. is this politics that goes back to what is the matter with kansas book a few years back. they would really not be affected by the tax increase that they want us to go through. >> it is one of the great ironies. it has to do with the big lie. if you tell the big lie over and over again people start believing it. and one of the l
things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>i jump out of my skin at people when i'm upset. do you share the sense of outrage that they're doing this, this corruption based on corruption based on corruption. >>i think that's an understatement, eliot. u>> i'm not prone tot. understatement, so explain to me why that is. i think the mob learned from wall st., not vice versa. >> as we reported, hostess went bankrupt after it was unable to resolve a labor dispute with unionized workers. the bakers union is fighting to make sure its voice is heard in the bankruptcy proceedings. it wants to make sure its members get what they're owed in pension payments and other promised benefits. the union has asked the judge overseeing the bankruptcy to appoint a member of the union to a group of trustees managing the winding down of the company. as it stands how to, no union members sit on the company's board and in fact, take a look at this. look at that! kind of looks like the new chairman of the gop house committee, doesn't it? the hostess board is en
in an attempt to indoctrinate students with certain ideas. according to the college fix, a political science class at butler university in indianapolis is asking students to, quote, write and speak in a way that does not assume americaness, whiteness, maleness, heterosexuals sexuality, middle class status, etc., to be the norm. if that's not enough, a normal community college was forced to reverse its ban on the word christmas after a student group hosted a charity christmas tree sale and legally questioned the school's action. penny, you're the liberal here. so we have to, quote -- why you laughing? >> because that's what you always categorize me as "the liberal." >> sean: you're a liberal democrat. why should you be ashamed of that? >> i'm very proud of it. >> sean: why are they asking students to not assume their -- what does it mean not to assume your americaness? >> i'm having a hard time, too, understanding what exactly their purpose is other than to say, you know, what we saw during the last election, we're a more diverse america we have probably at anytime, but yet we're still contin
, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ male announcer ] jill and her mouth have lived a great life. but she has some dental issues she's not happy about. so i introduced jill to crest pro-health for life. selected for people over 50. pro-health for life is a toothpaste that defends against tender, inflamed gums, sensitivity and weak enamel. conditions people over 50 experience. crest pro-health for life. so jill can keep living the good life. crest. life opens up when you do. can i still ship a gift in time for christmas? yeah, sure you can. great. where's your gift? uh... whew. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. ship fedex express by december 22nd for christmas delivery. part of a whole new line of tablets from dell. it's changing the conversation. ♪ syou know, i've helped alot ofof people save a lot of money. but today...( sfx: loud noise of metal object hitting the ground) things have been a little strange. (sfx: sound of piano smashing) roadrunner: meep meep. meep meep? (sfx: loud thud sound) awhat strange place. geico®. fifteen m
legislative speeches. the chamber will take up of the said measure to hold events degrees in science, technology, engineering event math. -- and math. live coverage here on c-span. it about 45 minutes, -- in about 45 minutes, julie rovner on the health-care law. health-care law.
there's no deal. does he deserve the blame? american enterprise institute and political science, norm, i understand that you blame grover front and center. he's the man carrying a pitch fork tonight. >> well, i blame grover, among others, for a lot of the tribalism we've had in the last few years, but it's also the case. if you look at the simpson-bowles report, the rivlin-dmin economy report, the gang of six and crapo and johanns, all say we need a deal that includes $4 trillion in debt reduction over ten years, and about a third of it coming from renues. you got revenues at 15% or just over that of gdp, and spending at 24%, and you got to bring the spending down, but you got to bring revenues up. frankly, we're not going to have a deal. gerri: it's the object of debate, debated every night here. >> yeah. gerri: i was looking at your bio, and back in 2006, you wrote a book called "how congress is failing americ" you must feel that you feel all of washington is the problem at this point. is this something that can't be fixed at this point? are we not going to come to a resolution of the
. this is not rocket science. don't pay and so you verify. if they do that we will save tens of billions of dollars and put more money back into medicare which will make it more solvent. gerri: you are suggesting we adopt private-sector ideas to a public sector system? thanks for coming on. a pleasure to talk to you. come back soon. appreciate your *. >> thank so much. gerri: winning the lottery is not the only way to come into money. maybe a leprechaun. a four leaf clover. it requires extra management. we will tell you what you need to remember. we'll be right back. ♪ you kn how painful heartburn can be. for fast, long lasting relief, use doctor recommended gaviscon®. only gaviscon® forms a protective barrier that helps block stomachcid from splashing up- relieving the pain quickly. try fast, long lasting gaviscon®. governor of getting it done. you know how to dance... with a deadline. and you...rent from national. because only natnal lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. this is aweme. [ male announcer ] yes,
't rocket science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. thanks for staying with us, i'm bill o'reilly miller time segment tonight. get to the sage of southern california he joins us from santa barbara. miller, you are listening to all the goings on here about christmas and you say? >> they won, face the face of modern progressivism. that's the inclusive guy you just talked to a while back. i'm the american preemptive. that's the new inclusive. it's america 180. so i'm just going to lock the pod face on and i'm going to say i don't think there is a war on anything except women. i prefer to think this is a seasonal comp trton brought up by a small man named lincoln chafee who if he was more i had ole the 00 particular outside the christmas tree. for seasonal sake what has happened to this country when i sing white christmas now i will no doubt be deemed to be a racist. we have lost our mind. lock the pod face on and stay low because the inmates are subletting the asylum. the only reason they don't go over santa is because they think he might be a mullah and they don't want to be
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we love hearing from our viewers. many are telling congress to reject austerity cuts and tax the rich instead. on twitter, laugh out loud gop jokes. if we only had a big election to decide if the rich should pay more taxes. ken oliver says we are on our way to following europe down the austerity toilet. the first priority should be jobs and growth instead of cutting spending. let us go over the fiscal cliff is necessary. keep sharing your thoughts with us on facebook and on twitter. one of the richest men in america is getting a free lunch at the white house. find out what mitt romney could bring to the table and the white house wants him to. we are right back. now with a fancy coating that gives you a burst of wildberry flavor. now why make a flavored heartburn pill? because this is america. and we don't just make things you want, we make things you didn't even know you wanted. like a spoon fork. spray cheese. and jeans made out of sweatpants. so grab yourself some new prilosec otc wildberry. [ male announcer ] one
are half of medications work using these receptors. and an economic science for their work on market design and matching theory, used to match kidney donors and assign kids to public schools in new york, boston, chicago. given the basic mental challenges these days we salute the brains raising the i.q. level of the nation's capital on thursday. >>> after the break, in 2011, the u.s. stopped a palestinian bid for u.n. recognition dead in its track. this year american opposition will have little impact on recognizing palestinian as a state. we'll ask how the tide turned when they join us live next on "now." two years ago, the people of bp made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. >>> it's a very unfortunate
science. it's just common sense, from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. chevron ceo john watson telling me exclusively today that the second largest u.s. energy company is moving forward on investments despite fiscal cliff concerns. we begin on our conversation, zeroing in on lawmakers' efforts in washington and whether he thinks they can work out a deal. >> i hope we can. there's greatty in the business community waiting for something to be done. there are big concerns about structural deficits going forward. there are concerns about tax increases that would be coming absent some sort of a deal on the fiscal cliff. >> the fiscal cliff has been the issue that has stopped or sort of made companies reluctant to push cash to work, to hire folks. is that stopping you, or are you moving forward regardless? >> actually, we've been moving forward with our investments. we're spending some $32 billion this year on energy projects around the world. i expect we'll spend even manufacture thmore than that next year. all we need is the opportunity to invest. we need to have access. we need permits, and
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